Libby Burgess, pianist

Who or what inspired you to take up the piano, and pursue a career in music? I was lucky to grow up with music at home – my parents are both musical, albeit not by profession, so there was music going on in the house, and I got my grubby toddler hands on the piano…

Judith Owen, singer-songwriter

The greatest pleasure comes from being a living breathing artist. From playing live, connecting with and making an audience laugh and cry. It’s what I always wanted… to connect. I remember my father telling me that if I my job was the thing I loved most in life, I’d be the luckiest person alive….

Gavin Roberts, pianist

I love devising programmes for festivals such as the St Marylebone Festival where we theme everything along cultural history and our local community

Huw Wiggin, saxophonist

One of my greatest challenges is to not compromise yourself as a musician artistically as it’s easy to fall in to a trap of always playing the music that people want to hear. I think that’s easy to do at the early part of your career but I reached a point where I said to myself, ‘why did you become a musician?’ and it was to not just play music which people are used to hearing but also to make people think a little. If it’s a new sound or interpretation, as the saxophone played in a classical way is then the artistic process is quite different to something that you are used to hearing and arouses an emotion or feeling which you weren’t sure was there.

Julian Perkins, conductor & harpsichordist

When I was starting out as a musician I sometimes worried too much about what people might think of me. Now, I try and focus more on the ever-changing process of making music and let the listeners decide for themselves what they like.